Inquiry into SDGs: Climate Action

This is a series of provocations designed to provide resources for students to inquire into the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs. For more, click here

Today’s provocation centers on the global goal of Climate Action, that is, the need to take “urgent action on climate change and its impacts.” Use the resources below to help students consider what this might mean for them!

Resource #1: HiCamp – A Letter to Congress By Christopher Newman

Resource #2: SciStarter Citizen Science video

See also the Earth Challenge 2020 & video here.

Resource #3: Planet Under Pressure by Moth

Resource #4: Climate Action Plan by Squint/Opera

Resource #5: What Can a Citizen Do? by Dave Eggers

Provocation Questions:

  • What is climate?
  • Why does our climate require action?
  • How does global citizenship connect to climate action?
  • What is our responsibility to take action for our environment?
  • How can one person make a difference?

featured image: DeathToTheStockPhoto

Inquiry into SDGs: Life on Land

This is a series of provocations designed to provide resources for students to inquire into the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs. For more, click here

The global goal of Life on Land is all about protecting and restoring ecosystems, forests, and biodiversity. In my experience, many children already tend to be passionate here, to saving endangered species to rainforest conservation, so bridging to the Sustainable Development Goals might be a natural connection.

Resource #1: Wildlife Aid’s ‘Saving Harry’ by Kris Hofmann

Resource #2: Nokia, HK Honey by Kiku Ohe

Resource  #3: Biotop by Jola Bańkowska

Resource #4: Toposcape by Adnaan Jiwa (might be a little advanced for younger students, but a fascinating watch!)

Resource #5: A Boy & a Jaguar by Alan Rabinowitz & Catia Chien 

Resource #6: The Tree Lady by  H. Joseph Hopkins & Jill McElmurry

Provocation Questions:

  • What is deforestation?
  • What is an ecosystem?
  • What is the connection between deforestation and animal species conservation?
  • Why is every species an important part of an ecosystem?
  • What is our responsibility for sustainable use of trees for ourselves? For our world?

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featured image: DeathToTheStockPhoto

Inquiry Into Being A Scientist

This is part of a series of provocations on learner identities. Discussing what it means to be a scientist certainly lends itself more to inquiry, but it’s still a valuable step to purposefully take. After all, as long as we insist on rigid science fairs, some students may feel that they only qualify as scientists if the Scientific Method is in play (complete with a tri-fold board).

Use the following resources to provoke thinking and discussion on what it really means to be a scientist!

Resource #1: Why I Study Physics by Shixie

Resource #2: Insight: From Migrant Farming to Mars via The Kid Should See This

Resource #3: Patterns in Nature by National  Geographic

Resource #4: Photography by Sebastião Salgado

This photo series is awe-inspiring. Compilation via Ted-Ed.

Resource #5: Tiny Perfect Things by M. H. Clark

Provocation Questions:

  • What does it mean to be a scientist?
  • What is the impact of seeing ourselves as scientists? (on ourselves, on our world?)
  • What is our responsibility to be scientists?
  • How does being a scientist relate to citizenship?
  • What is the connection between exploration and being a scientist?
  • What skills do scientists use?
  • What tools do scientists use?

featured image: DeathToTheStockPhoto

Provocation for Design in Nature

I am a huge sucker for time-lapse. It’s a mesmerizing phenomenon that by speeding up time, we get to feel like we’re slowing down. This is especially enjoyable when it comes to nature, which is why two of the four resources in this week’s inquiry include time-lapse videos.

The concept connections here include pattern, design, geometry, seasons, etc. Time lapse also lend themselves well to the PYP Transdiciplinary unit of “Where We Are in Place & Time.” But the exciting part about provocations is that we have no idea in which direction this might spark our students’ curiosity.

Resource #1: WoodSwimmer, time-lapse by bfophoto

Resource #2: Spring, time-lapse by Jamie Scott

Resource #3: Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature, picture book by Joyce Sidman and Beth Drommes

Resource #4: Animation Explores the Beautiful Circles of Our World, video by National Geographic

Provocation Questions:

  • How are change and patterns connected?
  • How are form and function connected in nature?
  • Why are there so many different designs and colors in nature?

featured image: DeathToTheStockPhoto